Beginning my career in Ostrava I consider to be much easier than in other countries. But maybe it also depends on the fact that here I have my family with me. When a man goes abroad alone, he concentrates mostly on the job and spends a lot of time in the office with colleagues. The people here in Ostrava helped me a lot to feel like home here. To start in Germany is not that easy for foreigners just because Germans are more closed.

Vanessa Nadine Hellwing (Germany)

It's a unique and different experience to live here in Ostrava. Some problems I had to face...it took me one month to learn how to ask for a tram ticket. So if you are planing to settle for longer time, I recommend to take course of Czech language. Make sure you join "Britské Centrum" (The British Liberary) near city centre to get in contact with many English speakers, it is the only place in the city to get some good books and CDs in English. 

Christopher McDougall (Great Britain)

I am very satisfied with living and working in this region. To prove this fact, after having been living here for 4 years I recently bought a house half way between Ostrava and the border with Poland. The Beskydy mountains close to Ostrava offer a great environment even if most of the time Ostrava is associated to its heavy industry. Fair enough the heavy industry is around but the city remain very green compares to many others cities of Europe. I have been a cycling racer before moving from France to Ostrava and I love riding the bike on the roads of the Beskydy. Ostrava is a dynamic city in constant development which offers I believe great opportunities. 

Philippe Muller (France)

Czech bread and czech transport (at least here in Ostrava) are on my list of "bests". I've lived here for nearly three years and consider moving here one of my best ideas ever. I struggle with the language but people are very helpful when I try to pronounce the unpronouncable. Czech has certainly become my home and my wife and I are very happy here.

Dave Lewis (Great Britain)

The Moravian-Silesian region offers beautiful surroundings such as the Beskydy mountains where Lysa Hora, the biggest mountain in the region is located. 

Working in Ostrava has offered me the possibility to see all this wonderful places and also to take part of a region that is in continuous development. Dolni Vitkovice is my favorite part in Ostrava where you can visit the Bolt Tower and have a coffee or beer from the highest point of the city.

Cristina Boccia (USA)

The region of Moravia-Silesia is an area with excellent transport connections and fascinating history. From the city of Ostrava, it is easy to get to Prague in just over 3 hours on the fastest train, while it is also possible to use local transport to travel to a historical village like Stramberk, with its own unique architecture and its famous baked ‘ears’. I recommend hiking up the mountain of Radhost – the cradle of Czech culture, with the statue of pagan god Radegast and the church of Saints Cyril and Methodius at the summit.

Ruth Hüneke (Great Britain)



Temporary, long-term and permanent residency, visas

Citizens of the EU / EEA and Switzerland who are planning to stay for longer than 30 days have an obligation to report their presence within 30 days of entering the Czech Republic to the appropriate department of the Immigration Police (“Cizinecká policie”).

If your stay will be longer than 3 months, you can apply for a certificate of TEMPORARY RESIDENCE.

You can request PERMANENT RESIDENCE after 5 years of continuous residence in the Czech Republic, or after 2 years of continuous temporary residence in the Czech Republic if for at least 1 year you have been a family relative of a Czech citizen who is registered as a permanent resident in the Czech Republic or a family relative of a citizen from another EU member state who has been issued a permanent residence permit for the Czech Republic.  

Third-country nationals are obliged to report their presence in the Czech Republic to the appropriate department of the Immigration Police (“Cizinecká policie”) within 3 working days of their entry into the Czech Republic. If you are arriving to receive a long-term or permanent residence permit, you may also report your presence at the relevant office of the Ministry of the Interior, where you must also provide biometric data.

Foreigners are also required to report a change of name, marital status or a change in a travel document or residence card. In the case of a visa-free stay or a stay on a short-term visa, these changes are to be reported to the Immigration Police (“Cizinecká policie”). In the case of long-term visas or long-term and permanent residencies, these changes are to be reported to the relevant office of the Ministry of the Interior.

Short-term stay (not exceeding 90 days) - Visa for a stay of up to 90 days (short-term)

Non-EU citizens not subject to a visa requirement  
Non-EU citizens subject to a visa requirement

A stay exceeding 90 days 

To stay in the Czech Republic for more than 90 days, citizens of non-EU countries require a long-term visa or a long-term or permanent residence permit.

Regional offices of the Ministry of the Interior

For districts: Ostrava, Opava, Karviná, Bruntál
address: Výstavní 55, 703 00 Ostrava-Vítkovice
tel: +420 974 721 874, +420 974 721 875
fax: +420 974 721 878 

Opening hours:   Mon, Wed: 8.00 – 17.00
                         Tue, Thu: 8.00 – 14.00
                         Fri: 8.00 – 11.00 (only for clients with an appointment)

For districts: Frýdek-Místek, Nový Jičín
address: Beskydská 2061, 738 19 Frýdek-Místek
tel: +420 974 732 850, +420 974 732 855
fax: +420 974 732 858

Opening hours:   Mon, Wed: 8.00 – 17.00
                         Tue, Thu: 8.00 – 14.00
                         Fri: 8.00 – 11.00 (only for clients with an appointment)

Offices of the Immigration Police (“Cizinecká policie”)

address: Milíčova 20, 728 51 Ostrava 
tel: +420 974 721 829, +420 974 721 849 
fax: +420 974 721 228
e-mail: krpt.ocp@pcr.cz, krpt.ocp.opa.ov.podatelna@pcr.cz



Meet up opportunities for foreigners

Most foreigners in the Region are from Slovakia, Vietnam and Ukraine. Usually foreigners meet each other at work (if they work together for one company) or at pubs and restaurants. You may also meet your compatriots living in the Region if you are attending a language school, visiting different Facebook groups or using other social networking tools. Some expat communities have their own websites.

Restaurants and places to meet, Facebook groups/websites

British/Irish/Americans, etc.:

French/Belgians:

Asians:

Slovaks:

Poles:

Greeks:

Italians:

Spanish:

Germans:



Hospitals, pharmacies, emergency

Hospitals - search from the list of the hospitals above by city or find the nearest hospital on the map.

Bílovec +420 556 771 771
Bohumín +420 596 096 111
Český Těšín +420 558 769 211
Frýdek-Místek +420 558 415 111
Havířov +420 596 491 111
Karviná-Ráj +420 596 383 111
Karviná - hornická nemocnice +420 596 380 111
Krnov +420 554 690 111
Město Albrechtice +420 554 684 111
Nový Jičín +420 556 773 111
Odry +420 556 778 100
Opava +420 553 766 111
Ostrava-Fifejdy +420 596 191 111
Ostrava-Poruba +420 597 371 111
Ostrava-Vítkovice +420 595 633 111
Rýmařov +420 554 253 111
Třinec +420 558 309 111
Třinec-Podlesí +420 558 304 111
Vítkov +420 556 314 111

Pharmacies - search from the list of the pharmacies in the region including address and opening hours or find the nearest pharmacy on the map.

Hospital emergency departmentsfind the nearest emergency department; there is a fee of 90 CZK per visit.

Emergency calls free of charge:
 

Emergency services 112
Fire Department 150
Municipal Police 156
National police 158
Ambulance 155

 

 



Regional and local authorities

Public Authorities

In towns and villages, the municipal authority and council building is generally one of the main centres of community life. Often these buildings also house other institutions, such as the tax office or the local job centre. These offices are a useful source of information not only for local people, but also for visitors in many common situations. Public authorities are normally open to the public on Mondays and Wednesdays. However, many authorities are open from Monday to Friday. If you wish to use the services of a municipal authority office in a city, town or village in the Moravian-Silesian Region, an official listing of these offices can be found here: Municipalities in the Region.

The official language at all public authorities in the Region is Czech. All documents and papers in a foreign language must be submitted to the authorities in their original version, accompanied by an authorized translation into Czech (unless the administration authority specifies that such a translation is not necessary). If you believe that you will not be able to understand everything when communicating with the authorities, you have the right to be assisted by an interpreter listed on the official register of interpreters; however, you have to provide the interpreter at your own expense (except for administrative proceedings in which a duty is imposed on you as the participant – e.g. proceedings relating to a misdemeanour or a minor offence).

Cadastral Offices

Land Registry offices (known as Cadastral Offices) in the Region

Tax Authorities

The Regional Tax Authorities



By plane

Regular scheduled flights serve the international Leoš Janáček Airport (code OSR), the second-largest airport in the Czech Republic. The airport is located in Mošnov, 20 km from the centre of the Region’s capital Ostrava. It offers direct flights to Prague, Paris, London, Düsseldorf, Dubai and Milan/Bergamo (timetable of scheduled flights). 

The Moravian-Silesian Region is working to introduce additional scheduled flights (to Amsterdam and Helsinki) from October 2016. In the summer season, both scheduled and charter flights to major tourist destinations are operated from Leoš Janáček Airport Ostrava.

For transport to/from the airport you can go by bus, train, taxi or you can rent a car.



Educational system for foreigners

Pre-school education

Pre-school education facilities that provide care for infants include day-care centres for children between 1 and 3 years of age and kindergartens attended by children aged 2 to ordinarily 6 years. Education in these facilities is voluntary, except obligatory last school year before attending primary school. The state does not provide pre-school education to the children of foreigners free of charge, so parents have to pay a fee that covers care, food and activities for the children. 

The school year begins in September and ends in June; during the summer holidays, the operation of these facilities is usually limited and kindergartens are closed for at least one month. Some kindergartens offer substitute programmes for these times. Parents may register their children with a kindergarten on special registration days, usually held in the spring (between 2 and 16 May) before the relevant school year begins. The specific date is determined by each kindergarten itself, and published on its own website or at its premises. 

Fees for pre-schools offering more interesting activities and specializations tend to be higher.

Primary and secondary education

Compulsory school attendance in the Czech Republic starts at the age of six, unless it is postponed, and lasts for nine years. Compulsory school attendance (known as “basic” school) is divided into two levels – the 1st level lasts for 5 years (grades 1 to 5), and the 2nd level lasts four years (grade 6 to 9). Compulsory education (if staying in the Czech Republic over 90 days) at primary or special schools is free of charge for the children of foreigners, as it is for Czech citizens.

EU citizens and third-country nationals can attend primary (“basic”) schools, secondary schools, and higher vocational colleges under the same conditions as citizens of the Czech Republic.

The school year starts on 1st September and ends on 31st August of the following calendar year. It is divided into the period of school attendance and the period of school holidays, which take place in July and August. The school year is divided into two terms; pupils receive a school report with grades at the end of each term.  

Classes are usually taught in the Czech language; other languages may be used with the permission of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports. Czech language preparatory courses are available for EU citizens, third-country nationals and refugee teenagers. When awarding the final grade in Czech Language and Literature, the teacher takes into account the level of language competence achieved by the pupil. The number of schools offering classes taught in foreign languages is growing. These schools are usually private and charge school fees.

There are an increasing number of international schools and pre-schools in the Moravian-Silesian Region, which are privately run. Some of them are:

A list of the schools that provide Czech language preparatory teaching for foreigners free of charge (before attending primary school).

Czech language courses for third-country nationals are provided by the Centre for Support of Integration of Foreigners.

Universities

Academic education can be acquired at 5 universities in the Region (classes are usually taught in the Czech language, except for those organized as part of the Erasmus+ programme):

Official Regional School and Preschool Guide (CZ version only)
Czech School Guide (CZ version only)



Banks and ATMs

Opening a bank account

Opening a bank account in Czech crowns (CZK) or a foreign currency in a local bank is relatively easy to do at any bank. You’ll likely find somebody behind the counter or close by who speaks English. The language skills of employees vary from branch to branch. Nevertheless, English is now the second most frequently used language in the country, after Czech. You can obtain information in English about banking services and products, and you can also use toll-free phone lines (starting with the digits 800). In order to open a current account or a foreign-currency account you’ll need two forms of identification (your passport and some other form of picture identification – like your driving licence) and a modest account setup fee. Typically, the minimum first deposit is 500 CZK. Some banks require potential clients to hold Czech long-term residency permits at the time of opening an account.

Cash machines (ATMs)

All major banks have their own network of cash machines (ATMs). Most accept standard cards (VISA is the most popular). The bank with the most ATMs is Česká spořitelna. Their ATMs are found in practically every town with a population over 5,000. There will always be an ATM within 10-20 km of you anywhere in the Region. All banks charge a fee for cash withdrawal and some fees can be quite high, especially when you are taking money out of another bank’s ATM (typically around CZK 40).

You’ll find an ATM location guide in every bank and on the bank’s website:



Embassies

In cases of need, foreign nationals may turn to their embassies/consulates in the Czech Republic. Most embassies and consulates are located in Prague, and some are in Brno. In the Moravian-Silesian Region (in Ostrava) there is only one consulate – for the Republic of Poland. List of foreign diplomatic missions to the Czech Republic.



Work permit/ Employee card/ Blue card

To be employed in the Czech Republic, no work permit, employee card or blue card is required for citizens of the EU/EEA, Switzerland and their family members (see legal status under the Employment Act), as well as for foreign nationals with a permanent residence permit. See other special cases when no permits are required. Family members of a EU citizen, who are not citizens of the EU themselves, may enter the labour market without the need for any permit if they have obtained a temporary residence permit in form of a residence card for family members of a EU citizen issued by the Ministry of the Interior, or if they can prove that an application for a temporary residence permit for family members of a EU citizen has been submitted.

Foreigners (third country nationals) may be employed in the Czech Republic if they have obtained a work permit and a residence permit, or an employee card or a blue card.

Work permit  

A foreigner may work in the Czech Republic if the foreigner holds a valid work permit and a valid residence visa for the purpose of employment. Foreigners must apply for a work permit in writing (download an application form here) to the relevant regional office of the Public Employment Service, usually prior to entering the Czech Republic. A work permit is issued mainly for short-term employment of up to six months, seasonal work, employment for a limited period for the purpose of increasing skills and qualifications (an internship), or occasional and time-limited employment of persons up to the age of 26 as part of an exchange between schools or as part of international youth programmes.

Employee card (formerly known as a “green card”)

An employee card issued by the Czech Republic is a long-term residence permit for the purpose of employment in the Czech Republic. The employee card combines a residence permit and a work permit in a single document.
To get an employee card you need an employment contract. How to get an employee card.
The employee card is valid for the period of employment set out in the employment contract, but for a maximum of 2 years.
You are obliged to inform the Ministry of the Interior of the termination of your employment or a change of employer or job position. If your employment is terminated during the validity period of your employee card, you can look for a new job in the central records of vacancies available for employee card holders and you can apply for an approval of a change of employer or job position. This application is submitted to an office of the Department of Asylum and Migration Policy of the Ministry of the Interior.

Important notice: Your employee card will be cancelled if you are unemployed for more than 3 consecutive months (or 1 month if you were employed on the basis of a temporary contract, known in Czech as “Dohoda o pracovní činnosti”). See FAQs. 

Blue card

The blue card is a permit for long-term residence for employment purposes in the Czech Republic under special circumstances. The blue card combines a residence permit and a work permit in one document. How to get a blue card.

To get a blue card you need an employment contract and a university education, or higher specialized education in which your studies lasted for at least 3 years. The blue card is valid for the period of employment set out in the employment contract plus 3 months, but for a maximum of 2 years.  See FAQs. 

Comprehensive information about employment for foreign citizens is published by the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs here.



Practical tips for car drivers

The road traffic rules in the Czech Republic are similar to those in other European countries. To drive, you need to be over 18 years old with an internationally recognized driving licence. For driving on motorways and dual carriageways (divided highways) designated by a white car symbol on a blue background, the speed limit is 130 km/h. On other roads outside municipalities, the speed limit is 90 km/h. In municipalities (built-up areas) the speed limit is 50 km/h. There is zero tolerance of alcohol (no blood alcohol at all is permitted), and vehicles must have their lights switched on all year round. Certain roads (marked with the symbol of a car and a snowflake) require the use of winter tyres between November 1 and March 31, regardless of the weather. If you are going to travel on the country's motorways, don't forget to get a motorway sticker. This will cost you CZK 1,500 for a one-year sticker, CZK 440 for a one-month sticker, or CZK 310 for a ten-day sticker. A map of roads where these stickers are mandatory can be found here.

Car parks are marked by a blue sign with a white letter P. Even if you have to pay to use a car park, this does not necessarily mean it is guarded; the operator is not responsible for the contents of the vehicle, so do not leave any documents, money or valuables visible inside your car.

Motor vehicle breakdown and recovery service (“Yellow Angels”) - call 1230

Current traffic information



National holidays and other holidays

National holidays and other holidays are public holidays, employers can only require employees to work on these days in exceptional cases.

National holidays:

1 January - Restoration of the Independent Czech State (1993)
8 May - Liberation Day, End of World War II (1945)
5 July - Saints Cyril and Methodius
6 July - Jan Hus (1415)
28 September - Czech Statehood, St. Wenceslas
28 OctoberCzechoslovak Independence (1918)
17 November - Student Struggle for Freedom and Democracy (1989)

Other holidays:

1 January - New Year’s Day
14 April 2017 - Good Friday (falls on different dates each year)
17 April 2017 - Easter Monday (falls on different dates each year)
1 May - Labour Day
24 December - Christmas Eve
25 December - Christmas Day
26 December - the Second Christmas Day, St. Stephen’s Day



Dictionary



Currency and unit converter



General information

The Moravian-Silesian Region is located in the easternmost part of the Czech Republic, on the border of three countries (the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Poland), in the heart of Central Europe.

From central Prague the Region is about 300 km as the crow flies; it is only 1 hour from Prague by plane, 3 hours by train and 4 hours by car.

Administrative structure

The Moravian-Silesian Region was established on 1st January 2001. The Region’s area is 5,427 km² and it covers the territory of 6 former districts (Bruntál, Opava, Nový Jičín, Ostrava, Karviná and Frýdek-Místek).

Climate in the Region

Climate is moderate. Average temperature in summer is between 16°C and 30°C and between 0°C and -15°C in winter.



Identification number, Czech nationality

How to obtain a Czech personal identification number (“birth number”) and Czech nationality?

The Police of the Czech Republic (specifically, the Immigration Police office responsible for the foreigner’s place of residence) will assign an official personal identification number (rodné číslo, meaning “birth number”) to a national of the EU, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Switzerland or his/her family member who has been granted confirmation of temporary residence in the Czech Republic or has been granted temporary or permanent residence.

A third-country national is assigned a “birth number” by the Police of the Czech Republic (specifically, the Immigration Police office responsible for the foreigner’s place of residence) if he/she is residing in the Czech Republic on the basis of a long-stay visa (a visa for a stay over 90 days), if he/she is in possession of a long-term or permanent residence permit, or if he/she has been granted asylum or subsidiary protection in the Czech Republic. No special documents or data are required for the Police to issue the “birth number”.

If a foreign national is not a holder of any of the above-listed residence permits, he/she may apply for a “birth number” to the Ministry of the Interior (Administrative Division, Personal Identification Numbers Department – in Czech: Odbor správních činností, Oddělení rodných čísel). The Ministry of the Interior will also issue a “birth number” to a third-country national who has been granted asylum or subsidiary protection in the Czech Republic in accordance with the Asylum Act. 

If you want to apply for citizenship of the Czech Republic, read more information here.



Health insurance

If a foreign national meets the requirements for participation in the Czech public health insurance system, the person first chooses a health insurance company (see the list below) and registers to be insured with one of them. The health insurance company is required to accept each person who meets the requirements for participation in the public health insurance system – i.e. a person who has permanent residence in the Czech Republic or a person who is an employee of an employer who has their registered address or their permanent residence in the Czech Republic.

If you have an employment contract, your employer is responsible for paying your health insurance and giving you your insurance card soon after the beginning of your employment.

If you work in the Czech Republic on the basis of a trade license (“živnostenské oprávnění”, i.e. if you are self-employed), you must pay your health insurance yourself. Health insurance for children of foreigners must be paid by their parents.

There are several types of health insurance; always ensure that you have guaranteed full coverage.

Health insurance companies

Public health insurance in the Czech Republic is provided via health insurance companies. Each of them has its own numerical identification code and abbreviation:

111 Všeobecná zdravotní pojišťovna ČR (VZP ČR)
201 Vojenská zdravotní pojišťovna České republiky (VoZP ČR)
205 Česká průmyslová zdravotní pojišťovna (ČPZP)
207 Oborová zdravotní pojišťovna zaměstnanců bank, pojišťoven a stavebnictví (OZP)
209 Zaměstnanecká pojišťovna Škoda (ZPŠ)
211 Zdravotní pojišťovna ministerstva vnitra ČR (ZPMV ČR)
213 Revírní bratrská pokladna, zdravotní pojišťovna (RBP)

Foreign nationals without permanent residency in the Czech Republic and who are not employed in the Czech Republic cannot participate in the public health insurance system.  In most such cases, these individuals will need to arrange for their own private or travel health insurance. Such insurance is different from and independent of the Czech public health insurance system. Such private insurance will be based on a contractual relationship (an insurance policy) entered into between the insured person and the insurance company. Such insurance is not offered by the above-listed Czech health insurance companies, but rather by insurance companies covered by Act No. 277/2009 Sb. on insurance:

VZP/PVZP (address: Perštýn 6, Prague 1, tel: +420 221 668 111) 
Maxima/AXA (address: Na dlouhém lánu 41, Prague 6, tel: +420 272 099 900, email: info@maxima-as.cz)
Slavia pojišťovna (address: Revoluční 1, Prague 1, tel: +420 255 790 111, email: info@slavia-pojisteni.cz)
UNIQA pojišťovna (address: Evropská 136, Prague 6, tel: +420 800 120 020, email: info@uniqa.cz)
ERGO pojišťovna (address: Ostružnická 327/10, 779 00 Olomouc, tel: +420 602 719 340, email: info@ergo.cz)

You may also contact the Centre for Medical Insurance of Foreigners in Brno or Prague.

Find more information about health insurance issued by the Czech Republic Ministry of Health.



Public transport

Public transport systems operate in Ostrava, Opava, Frýdek-Místek, Havířov, Karviná, Orlová, Třinec, Český Těšín, Bruntál and Krnov. Most of these systems connect to inter-city buses and trains. Ostrava currently has direct rail links to Prague (3 hours), Vienna (3 hours), Bratislava (3 hours), Warsaw (4.5 hours), Budapest (6 hours) and Moscow (27.5 hours). For international rail travellers we recommend the stations in Ostrava-Svinov or Ostrava main station (in Czech “hlavní nádraží”), which offer the best services for passengers.

Search for transport timetables and connections at IDOS timetable site or download a timetable app for your mobile.

Tickets

for trains - for travelling by train it is necessary to buy a ticket from the ticket office of any railway station before getting on board the train. If travelling from smaller stations, where ticket offices are not always open outside peak times (especially during the night), passengers may buy a ticket from the staff on board the train.

for trolleybuses, buses or trams - you can buy tickets from the driver (with a surcharge), from ticket vending machines (orange boxes), from external vendors (designated by the ticket symbol) or you can pay the fare online using the SMS ticket system. When you get on board you must validate your ticket immediately after boarding by inserting it into the machine near each door.

A passenger may board the vehicle with a maximum of 3 pieces of luggage. If the luggage exceeds the dimensions 30 x 40 x 60 cm and is not on the list of items that can be carried free of charge, a fare must be paid for such luggage too.

Prices of short-distance tickets in Ostrava: 10 min. ticket = 16 CZK, 30 min. ticket = 20 CZK, 60 min. ticket = 26 CZK, 24 hour ticket = 80 CZK

Basic rules for boarding buses and trolleybuses between 8 pm and 4 am: please board using only the front door. Immediately after boarding, validate your ticket or show the driver your season ticket.

Ticket inspection

Passengers are obliged to produce a valid travel document (a validated ticket, or a season ticket - ODIS card) to authorized ticket inspectors (inspectors will show either a badge or a card proving their identity). Passengers failing to do so are obliged to pay the fare, plus a fine of up to 1,500 CZK. A validated ticket remains valid for the period indicated on the ticket (corresponding to the ticket type and price). Please report any errors in ticket validation to the driver.



Czech language courses for foreigners

Czech language courses are provided by language schools and language educational centres:



Post offices, Czech POINTs

Post offices

The Czech Post Office provides postal services throughout the Czech Republic, including parcels and cash transfers (both domestically and internationally). Post boxes (which are orange) can be found throughout the Moravian-Silesian Region; they are located in many public places.

Post offices are located in all towns and cities, and also in many villages, and their opening hours are most often Monday – Friday from 8 am until 5 pm. Post offices in larger cities sometimes open until 7 pm, and also on Saturdays.

Post offices may seem confusing to foreigners because they have separate windows for different services. Find the right symbol to avoid unnecessary waiting in line: letters may be sent at windows marked “listovní služby” (meaning “letter services”), parcels are handled at “balíky” (“packages”), and you can buy stamps at the window marked “známky” (“stamps”). It is normally easier just to send a Czech speaker or go with him/her.

More information on services provided by the Czech Post Office can be found on its official website. Besides using your local post office, it is also possible to use the following providers for fast and reliable delivery:

Czech POINT

Czech POINT is the name of an IT platform that offers easy public access to various official documents and enables you to communicate with the authorities in some situations (e.g. when submitting certain types of official applications).

Czech POINT workstations are located at local (city and municipal) authorities and at post offices; they are also operated by certain notaries, and it is also possible to use them abroad (at Czech embassies and consulates).  

You can get certified printouts (extracts) of data from a number of official information systems such as the Criminal Register, the Land Register, or the Commercial Register. You can also use the Czech POINT network for communicating with the authorities (e.g. when submitting certain types of official applications). An up-to-date list of Czech POINT workstations in the Region is available here.

The Czech POINT system provides a wide range of services. Among the most commonly used are:

  • Printouts from the Land Register
  • Printouts from the Commercial Register (i.e. the register of companies)  
  • Printouts from the Register of Licensed Traders
  • Printouts from the Criminal Register  
  • Submission of applications under the Commercial Code (i.e. some business-related applications)
  • Printouts of a driver’s penalty points record
  • Printouts from the Insolvency Register
  • Authorized document conversion and services related to the national electronic “data box” system
  • Czech POINT E-SHOP – online ordering of various services

All Czech POINTS are shown on the map.



Regional and local authorities

Public Authorities

In towns and villages, the municipal authority and council building is generally one of the main centres of community life. Often these buildings also house other institutions, such as the tax office or the local job centre. These offices are a useful source of information not only for local people, but also for visitors in many common situations. Public authorities are normally open to the public on Mondays and Wednesdays. However, many authorities are open from Monday to Friday. If you wish to use the services of a municipal authority office in a city, town or village in the Moravian-Silesian Region, an official listing of these offices can be found here: Municipalities in the Region.

The official language at all public authorities in the Region is Czech. All documents and papers in a foreign language must be submitted to the authorities in their original version, accompanied by an authorized translation into Czech (unless the administration authority specifies that such a translation is not necessary). If you believe that you will not be able to understand everything when communicating with the authorities, you have the right to be assisted by an interpreter listed on the official register of interpreters; however, you have to provide the interpreter at your own expense (except for administrative proceedings in which a duty is imposed on you as the participant – e.g. proceedings relating to a misdemeanour or a minor offence).

Cadastral Offices

Land Registry offices (known as Cadastral Offices) in the Region

Tax Authorities

The Regional Tax Authorities



Job offers, first salary

EU/EEA and Swiss citizens and their family members can find listings of job vacancies at the EURES website.

Non-EU citizens can browse the vacancies database or sign up and post their CVs. This search is set up to automatically display job offers that are suitable for foreigners, i.e. where the employer is authorized and is willing to employ foreigners.

List of Regional offices of the Public Employment Service

Other websites with job opportunities in the Region (mainly in Czech):

Recruitment agencies:

First salary

All potential employees are recommended to be ready to pay all fees and payments related to accommodation, food, transport etc. (15-20.000 CZK) for the first 40 days of their staying (employment) in the Czech Republic. The first salary shall be sent to the employee´s bank account on the 15th day of the month to follow the first month of work. 



Basic statistical data

Area: 5.427 km²
Number of inhabitants: 1.213.000
Number of municipalities: 300, of which 42 are towns/cities
Population density: 230,7 inhabitants per km² (the second highest in the country, after the capital Prague)
Most of the population is urban: 62% of the Region’s people live in towns and cities with over 20.000 inhabitants
Average monthly wage in the Czech Republic: 26.072 CZK (in 2015)
Average monthly wage in the Moravian-Silesian Region: 23.628 CZK (in 2015)
Unemployment rate: 7,9 %
Gross Domestic Product: 411.950 mil. CZK (in 2014)
Municipality with the most inhabitants: Ostrava (301.485 inhabitants)
Municipality with the greatest area: Ostrava (21.423 hectares)
Municipality with the highest population density: Havířov (2.658,9 inhabitants/km²)
Municipality with the lowest number of inhabitants: Nová Pláň (34 inhabitants)
Municipality with the smallest area: Karlova Studánka (46 hectares)
Municipality with the lowest population density: Bílá (5,8 inhabitants/km²)
Highest point: Praděd mountain (1.491 metres above sea level)
Lowest point: confluence of the Odra and Olše Rivers (195 metres above sea level)
Largest reservoir: Slezská Harta (870 hectares)
Largest outdoor swimming pool: Ostrava-Poruba (water area 41.200 m²)



Police

The National Police and Municipal Police

In some situations, you may need to use the services of the police. Throughout the Czech Republic there are two types of police force – the National Police (tel.: 158) and the local Municipal Police (tel.: 156).

The National Police (in Czech “Policie České republiky”) assist at road accidents, thefts, assaults and other unpleasant situations. The National Police also incorporates the Immigration Police (“Cizinecká policie”), which grants residence permits to foreign nationals and deals with immigration-related issues.

The Municipal Police (in Czech “Městská policie”) is responsible for the majority of everyday public order policing in towns and cities (including some traffic policing and all parking enforcement), though it also assists in certain emergency situations. 



Events in the Region

Try a search engine for events and see which ones you might like:



Embassies

In cases of need, foreign nationals may turn to their embassies/consulates in the Czech Republic. Most embassies and consulates are located in Prague, and some are in Brno. In the Moravian-Silesian Region (in Ostrava) there is only one consulate – for the Republic of Poland. List of foreign diplomatic missions to the Czech Republic.



Taxi

Private taxis operate 24 hours a day in the Moravian-Silesian Region. The price per 1 km is usually around 20 CZK. A taxi must be marked with a yellow roof lamp showing the word TAXI and with intermittent black and white stripes on the sides of the car. A price list must be displayed at a visible location inside the vehicle (usually on the dashboard next to the driver).  Taxis can either be hired at designated taxi ranks or booked by phone – it is not common to stop a taxi passing on the street. List of taxi services.  



Who will help you find an apartment

In the Region there are several estate agencies which will help you find an apartment to rent or to purchase. For the purchase of an apartment, estate agencies usually do not require a fee (or rather, they require it from the seller). However, when arranging rental, estate agencies demand either a payment in the form of a fixed sum, or the payment of one month’s rent (or possibly 2 or 3 times the monthly rent).

Arranging to rent an apartment through an estate agency is usually more expensive than renting direct from the owner. However, there is one advantage – the estate agency will prepare an occupational lease for you (i.e. the contract for the lease). But even in this situation, we recommend that you consult an independent solicitor (lawyer) about this occupational lease.

You can also find an apartment through advertisements, noticeboards and the internet. You can rent an apartment with any type of residence permit. But you can purchase an apartment only if you have a permit for permanent residence or if you have been granted asylum status.

You can search for accommodation yourself, filtering by different property type and star rating with this Booking guide. For cheap accommodation in the Region click here.

Accommodation offered by large estate agencies (mainly in Czech):

You can also try the search engines of many estate agencies in English:



Insurance offices

Each foreigner who intends to stay in the Czech Republic must have medical insurance. There are two types – public and commercial health insurance. For more information click here.



Unemployment support, social security system

What to do if you lose your job

Unemployment support, visiting a Job Centre for the first time, and other information: here.

Information for if you lose your job: download leaflet or see the FAQs.

What to watch out in the case of termination of employment – download leaflet.

Czech Labour Codedownload here


The social security system

Social security and legal protection of employed female foreigners and their familiesdownload leaflet
Disability - Disability pensions, the Assessment Service and EU social assistance benefits
Sickness insurance system – more info here
Pensions – information about the pension system
Social services - providers and access



ODIS card

The ODIS card (in Czech “ODISka”) is an electronic payment card for use on public transport services within the Moravian-Silesian Region’s integrated transport system (known by the abbreviation ODIS). It is a contactless smart card which can be used as a long-term season ticket, or as an “electronic wallet”, or as a combination of both. The ODIS card can also be used as a carrier for other products, such as the "ČD Card" (for train transport); for more information on the advantages of using an ODIS card, see here.

Where to get an ODIS card?



Explanation of basic concepts

Lease

The contractual relationship between the owner (or landlord) of an apartment and the tenant. The rights of tenants are protected by the Civil Code. The tenant signs an occupational lease (i.e. a lease contract) with the owner or landlord. The tenant must pay for any necessary minor repairs in the apartment. A rented apartment may be owned by the municipality, or it may be privately owned. Tenants have fewer legal rights than owners/landlords, who may terminate the occupational lease (contract) if the tenant fails to pay the rent, or may also increase the rent. However, owners/landlords are not allowed to terminate the occupational lease without warning and without giving reasons. An occupational lease may be combined with a different type of contract (e.g. a contract of employment). Tenants in apartments owned by their employer enjoy a lower degree of protection than other tenants. In such a case, the termination of employment usually means that the occupational lease is terminated automatically.

Sublease

The contractual relationship between the tenant of an apartment and another person, known as the sub-tenant. In most cases the owner/landlord of the apartment must also give their consent to the sublease. Sub-tenants do not enjoy the same degree of legal protection as tenants, and the specific conditions of the agreement between the tenant and the sub-tenant are set out in the sublease. The tenant subleases either the entire apartment or part of the apartment to the sub-tenant. Sub-tenants have much fewer rights than tenants; a sublease can be terminated at any time without giving reasons, and if the tenant’s lease agreement is terminated, the sublease is also terminated automatically. If a sublease is terminated, the owner/landlord is not legally obliged to find replacement accommodation for the sub-tenant (this right only applies to tenants after the termination of their lease). If the tenant is permanently resident in the apartment, s/he may sublease part of the apartment without the consent of the owner/landlord.

Ownership

Owners of apartments may use their apartments for their own purposes, or they may lease them to tenants. Ownership of real estate is recorded in the Land Registry (“Katastr nemovitostí”). In a block containing five or more apartments of which at least three are owned by three different owners, the law requires the establishment of an owners’ association. If the owner of a block is a legal entity, the apartments are usually leased to tenants. If the owner is a housing cooperative (in Czech “bytové družstvo”), the tenants are the members of the cooperative. (Nowadays it is very rare for a housing cooperative to own all the apartments in a block; it is much more common for some of the apartments to be owned by the cooperative, while others are privately owned.) However, the members of a housing cooperative, although technically they are tenants and not owners, are actually in a very similar legal position to owners, and they enjoy similar rights. For example, the statutes of a housing cooperative guarantee the right of tenancy to its members. The members can also use their voting rights to influence the decisions taken by the cooperative as a whole. For these reasons, membership of a housing cooperative is almost like a form of ownership; housing cooperative members are in a much stronger position than normal tenants with an occupational lease.



Restaurants

Czech restaurants offer something for all tastes. For a list of restaurants serving traditional Czech food to excellent standards of quality, see this list of certified restaurants. For a complete list of restaurants in the Region click here.

We also recommend you search for restaurants using any major search engine:

or download an app for your smartphone:



Shopping malls, retail parks and stores

Ostrava

  • Avion Shopping Park Rudná 3114/114, Ostrava, open until 9pm, Albert until 10pm, see on the map
  • Retail park Výškovická 46/3123, Ostrava, open until 9pm, see on the map
  • OC Forum Nová Karolina Jantarová 4, Ostrava, open until 9pm, see on the map
  • OC Galerie Sjízdná 5554/2a, Ostrava-Třebovice, open until 8pm, Tesco until 12pm, see on the map
  • OC Futurum Novinářská 6a, Ostrava, open until 9pm, Tesco until 12pm, see on the map
  • Retail park, Varenská 3309/50, Ostrava, open until 8pm, see on the map
  • OC Karolína Vítkovická 3278/3, Ostrava, open until 8pm, Kaufland until 10pm, see on the map
  • OC Laso Masarykovo Náměstí 3090/15, Ostrava, open until 8pm, Sat until 7pm, see on the map

Karviná

  • OC Karviná Nádražní 1939/4a, Karviná, open until 8 pm, Albert until 10pm, see on the map  
  • OD Prior 17. Listopadu 23/2, Karviná-Fryštát, open until 6pm, Sat until 12am, see on the map

Frýdek-Místek

  • OC Frýda Na Příkopě 3727, Frýdek-Místek, open every day until 8pm, see on the map
  • Paráda shopping Dobrovského 3680, Frýdek-Místek, open until 8pm, see on the map 
  • OD Prior Frýdlantská 150, Frýdek-Místek, open until 6pm, Sat until 12am, see on the map
  • Retail park, Pionýrů 2280, Frýdek-Místek, see on the map

Opava

Nový Jičín

Bruntál

Havířov

  • Nákupní park Havířov Před Tratí 1433/4, Havířov, open until 8pm, see on the map
  • OD ELAN Dlouhá třída 860/1a, Havířov – Město, open until 7pm, Sat until 2pm, see on the map
  • OD Permon Dlouhá třída 1228/44, Havířov, see on the map
  • Retail park, U Stadionu 1640/1, Havířov, see on the map

Třinec

  • OD Prior Dukelská 1137, Třinec, open until 6pm, Sat until 12am, see on the map
  • Retail park Tesco, Frýdecká 79, Třinec, open until 9pm, Tesco until 12pm, see on the map

Orlová

  • OD Prior Masarykova tř. 795, Orlová-Lutyně, open until 6pm, Sat until 12am, see on the map

Krnov

  • OD Prior Zámecké náměstí 4, Krnov, open until 6pm, Sat until 12am, see on the map

Kopřivnice

  • Retail park Štefánikova 1408/18e, Kopřivnice, open until 8pm, see on the map

Studénka

  • OC Vagonář, Náměstí Republiky 697, Studénka, see on the map
  • Retail park, Sjednocení 846, Studénka, see on the map

Kopřivnice

  • Retail park, Štefánikova 1408/18E, Kopřivnice, see on the map

Český Těšín

  • Retail park Ostravská 2030/77, Český Těšín, see on the map
  • Retail park Jablunkovská 2041, Český Těšín, see on the map

Hranice na Moravě

  • Stop Shop Družstevní 2072, Hranice na Moravě, open until 8pm, see on the map

Frýdlant nad Ostravicí

  • Retail park Hlavní 1602, Frýdlant nad Ostravicí, see on the map

Frenštát pod Radhoštěm

  • Retail park Pod Šenkem 1906, Frenštát pod Radhoštěm, see on the map

Jablunkov

  • Retail park Bukovecká 76, Jablunkov, see on the map


Electricity, gas, water, other services

Hotlines for problems with utilities
 

Electricity +420 840 850 860
Gas 1239
Water (Ostrava) +420 800 202 700
Water (Hlučín) +420 595 043 333
Water (Bruntál) +420 800 136 633
Water (Krnov) +420 554 610 641
Water (Rýmařov) +420 800 136 633
Water (the rest of the Region) +420 840 111 125

Registration for utilities in your home 

Before moving into an apartment, you need to register as a customer of the utility companies. Sorting out issues related to gas and electricity supply can take several days, and in some cases weeks. For this reason it is important to deal with everything well in advance, if possible before you move - or will you have to expect to be without electricity and gas for several days in your new home.

Registration as an electricity customer

Registration as an electricity customer can be arranged in the customer service centres of regional distributors (they usually cover a particular region, or sometimes several regions - Prague, Central Bohemia, North Moravia, and so on). When registering as a customer, you will pay an administrative fee and agree on how much you will pay per month for electricity. After this, a technician will call round to connect the electricity meter. The waiting time for an electricity connection varies among distributors.

For the registration process you will need the following: a completed application form, the occupational lease (i.e. the lease contract) for your apartment (or a document proving your ownership of the apartment), and (if you are not the owner) a statement of approval from the owner of the apartment, signed by the owner. For a new apartment (or an apartment where the electricity supply has been disconnected for more than 6 months), a technical inspection of the electrical system must be carried out before the meter is connected. For other apartments, the former customer first has to be de-registered. If your type of residence is other than permanent residence or asylum, you will also need a guarantor – i.e. a person who will guarantee to pay any outstanding electricity bills after your departure from the country. The guarantor must be a Czech citizen, and s/he must be personally present when you sign your contract with the electricity company.

Prices of electricity for households are set by the government of the Czech Republic. You can choose from several price bands, which vary depending on the volume of electricity consumed; some are intended only for households where all of the equipment and appliances run on electricity. The staff at the electricity company will advise you. You will make monthly payments (in some cases once every two months), based on your expected consumption. Your meter will be read three times a year to determine your actual consumption, and the company will then send you a bill detailing your consumption, along with (if necessary) a payment slip for you to pay the outstanding balance, and the new level of the monthly payments (for the next 4 months).

Registration as a gas customer

If your apartment has gas appliances, you will need to register with the gas company; in each region there is a separate company (e.g. Central Bohemia, etc.). In order to register with the gas company, you will need the occupational lease (i.e. the lease contract) for the apartment, and you will also pay a fee for connection to a gas meter.

Prices of gas for households are set by the government of the Czech Republic. You will make monthly payments based on expected consumption. The meter is usually read once a year, and a bill is then sent to you.

Registration as a water customer

Registration as a water customer only needs to be arranged if you are living in your own house. The registration is arranged at the regional water and sewerage company.

Refuse collection

Refuse collection (bins, sacks) also needs to be arranged only by those living in their own house; it is arranged at your local municipal authority. Currently each municipality sets a certain annual amount per person for refuse collection. If you live in an apartment, it depends on the practice in the individual block whether this sum is paid by you or whether it is paid on your behalf by the residents’ association. If you live in a rented apartment (or are a member of a housing cooperative – in Czech “bytové družstvo”), payments for water and refuse collection are usually a part of the services supplied and charged for by the landlord or the cooperative.

 



Mobile operators

The Czech Republic currently has four mobile network operators who are fighting hard to win and keep clients. You’ll find more information on tariffs and services on the websites of the individual operators:

List of virtual operators (working on the infrastructure of the major operators):

3ton +4U 99mobile Air Telecom Aqua Mobil BLESKmobil
Bezdrat.net (Fortech) C2net Mobil CallPro  Centropol Telecom City Mobile Coop Mobil s.r.o.
Connectica  ČEZ Mobil Emtéčko  Europerator  Fast Mobile  Fayn
GoMobil Gorila Mobil Ha-loo mobil  Kaktus Klokanmobil  KT mobil
LAMA Mobil L-Tel Metronet Mikrotech Mobil.cz MobilCall
Nej TV Netbox NWT Mobil Odorik One Mobile OpenCall
Oskarta OtavaNet Palmafone Private Mobile Relax Mobil Reptil
Right Mobile RWE Mobil S-Mobile SAZKAmobil Sevencall Skyfone
StarTel Studentfone Telestica Teleúspory Tesco mobile Voocall
WIA Mobil Žlutá simka        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Calling abroad

When calling outside of the Czech Republic, you have to dial 00 or the “+” sign, followed by the code for whichever country you’re calling to. The Czech Republic calling code is 420. You’ll find a list of international codes here.

Be sure that no matter who your service provider is, you’ll get the lowest rates for international calls if you use their net calling service, which means that you call through an IP network. A different prefix is used than the usual “00”; for the company Vodafone, replace “00” with “77”, or for O2 replace “00” with “55”.

With Telefónica O2 you can use the X-call service (you don’t have to register for this service). The X-call service enables you to call for a very low price in evening hours, at night, over the weekend and on national holidays. You can make cheaper calls to selected countries from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. on weekdays, and 24 hours at weekends and on national holidays using the access code 970. Just dial 970, then the international access code (00 followed by the country code), then the number you want to reach.